Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus

aureus (MRSA)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to certain antibiotics called beta-lactams. These antibiotics include methicillin and other more common antibiotics such as oxacillin, penicillin, and amoxicillin. In the community, most MRSA infections are skin infections. More severe or potentially life-threatening MRSA infections occur most frequently among patients in healthcare settings. CuVerro® bactericidal copper surfaces have the inherent ability to kill MRSA and other [qtip:bacteria|Laboratory testing has shown that when cleaned regularly CuVerro® surfaces demonstrate effective antibacterial action against … MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli O157:H7,VRE (vancomycin resistant enterococci) …]. Click here for more information.

 

 

What types of infections does MRSA cause?

MRSA in healthcare settings usually causes more severe and potentially life-threatening infections, such as bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, or pneumonia. The signs and symptoms will vary by the type and stage of the infection.

Who is at risk for infection?

MRSA infections can occur in any geographic location and anywhere on a person’s body and can affect anyone. Historically, MRSA infections occurred in hospitalized patients, but now these infections are common in the community. The biggest risk factor for MRSA infection is open or broken skin (such as a wound or surgical site); however, MRSA infections can occur even on areas of the skin where there is no obvious wound or break in the skin. Patients in healthcare facilities have weakened immune systems and undergo procedures (such as surgery) or have catheters inserted into the skin that make it easier for MRSA to get into the body. It is for this reason that healthcare personnel must follow infection control procedures (such as hand hygiene and proper catheter care) to prevent patients from acquiring MRSA infections. When patients get MRSA in healthcare facilities, the infections tend to be severe. 

How is MRSA spread?

Healthcare procedures can leave patients vulnerable to MRSA, which is typically spread in healthcare settings from patient to patient on unclean hands of healthcare personnel or through the improper use or reuse of equipment. MRSA infections, as with all staph, are usually spread by having contact with someone’s skin infection or personal items they have used, like towels, bandages, or razors that touched their infected skin. These infections are most likely to be spread in places where people are in close contact with others—for instance, schools and locker rooms where athletes might share razors or towels. Factors that have been associated with the spread of MRSA skin infections include: close skin-to-skin contact, openings in the skin such as cuts or abrasions, contaminated items and surfaces, crowded living conditions, and poor hygiene. People may be more at risk in locations where these factors are common, including: athletic facilities, dormitories, military barracks, households, correctional facilities, and daycare centers.

How are MRSA infections treated?

Incision and drainage constitutes the primary therapy for these purulent skin infections. Empiric antimicrobial coverage for MRSA may be warranted in addition to incision and drainage based on clinical assessment (e.g., presence of systemic symptoms, severe local symptoms, immune suppression, extremes of patient age, infections in a difficult to drain area, or lack of response to incision and drainage alone). Antibiotic treatment, if indicated, should be guided by the susceptibility profile of the organism. Obtaining specimens for culture and susceptibility testing is useful to guide therapy, particularly for those with more severe infections and those who fail to respond adequately to initial management. MRSA skin infections can develop into more serious infections.

Ask your healthcare provider about CuVerro® bactericidal copper surfaces today! 

Click here to learn more about how copper can kill MRSA and other [qtip:bacteria|Laboratory testing has shown that when cleaned regularly CuVerro® surfaces demonstrate effective antibacterial action against … MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus), Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli O157:H7,VRE (vancomycin resistant enterococci) …]View our product gallery to see available products made with CuVerro® bactericidal copper surfaces. Please contact us for more information about CuVerro®.

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/index.html